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Tuesday, October 7, 2014

MEETING HOUSE AND PARSONAGE


Photo by author (1986)

Thursday, October 2, 2014

TIMELINE

[History of the Church of the Brethren Northern Illinois and Wisconsin]
A group of members settled south of the Chippewa River apart from the main body of the Irvin Creek congregation, of which they were a part. They held regular preaching services, at least one love feast and several council meetings in which they considered matters pertaining to their local interests. On September 23 and 24, 1877, they held a love feast in the home of Samuel H. Baker. Present at this feast from Minnesota were Elders C. F. Wirt, Davis Whetstone, and Peter Strubble, who then and there ordained Samuel H. Baker to the eldership (p. 107).

CORRESPONDENCE
[Brethren at Work, June 5, 1879]
Brother S. H. Baker, who attended our District Meeting, writes that he reached his home in Wisconsin all right. He walked one hundred miles on his way home. He speaks of a pleasant meeting he held, and then makes mention of a hailstorm passing through Dunn County, some of the hailstones measuring eight inches in circumference.

CORRESPONDENCE
[Brethren at Work, August 23, 1881]
From James A. Baker. —As it may interest some of our brethren and sisters to hear a word from Wisconsin, we take pleasure in writing a few lines through the columns of your worthy paper. Last spring, our elder (S. H. Baker) moved from us, locating with brethren at River Falls, same state, leaving but one minister with us to carry on the great work, a brother of our elder, and also of the writer. Although brother Henry is young in years, as well as in the ministry, he tries to preach the truth as taught by our blessed Master. As a testimony of his labors, last Saturday two sisters made the good confession and were baptized the same day. More are now counting the cost. Hope they may choose the right way. Those baptized were the wife and mother-in-law of the writer. Our love feast will be Sept. 10th. —Chippewa Church, Wis.

CORRESPONDENCE
[The Gospel Messenger, July 24, 1883]
From Chippewa Valley Church, Wis.July 17.

Dear Brethren:
We are prospering as a church here. —The church seems to be in love and union. We had Communion on the 23rd of June; had a very pleasant meeting. Ministers present, Wm. Clark, S. H. Baker, and Samuel Crist. Two were reclaimed on the day of the Feast. Last Sunday was our regular meeting day, we had a very interesting meeting; four precious souls made the good confession and were baptized.
Katie Baker

CORRESPONDENCE
From Tyrone, Wis.
[The Gospel Messenger, January 8, 1884]

Dear Brethren:
The church here is moving on harmoniously. I am alone in the ministry and would like very much if some of the Brethren would give us a call, for we need some encouragement in Wisconsin, as well as other places.
Henry C. Baker

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, August 17, 1886]
Williams. —In the Chippewa Valley church, Dunn Co., Wis., Aug. 1, Harry, son of Mr. Marvin and Mrs. Etta Williams. Disease, cholera infantum. Services by H. C. Baker, from Matt. 18:3.
Katie A. Baker

CORRESPONDENCE
From Edson, Wis.
[The Gospel Messenger, July 26, 1887]
I left home June 24th; commenced meetings on the evening of the 25th. I have spent over a week with the brethren in Chippewa Valley Church, Dunn Co., Wisconsin. On Saturday eve, July 2nd, we held a love feast. We closed the meetings next day. We had a pleasant feast; some of the brethren and sisters from Irvin Creek church—a distance upwards of twenty miles, were present. The only residing minister is Henry C. Baker. A continuance in well-doing may overcome the opposition which consists principally of scoffers of religion. Good material is here, and a few will likely be added now and then. No feast has been held here for several years. Since last winter, peace and love is restored, and joy and gladness was depicted on every countenance as of yore. S. H. Baker and wife, and myself, started on Monday, July 4th, for this place. Arrived the same evening at the house of Almon Mock, a deacon. Here, Elder S. H. Baker learned last winter, was a colony of Brethren from Indiana who emigrated a few years ago from that state. He paid them a visit in April and preached eight sermons. The immediate result was ten were baptized, making in all eighteen members. We held a few meetings during the week. Yesterday, Sunday, had two meetings; at 5 P. M. repaired to the waterside where three were added by baptism; they were probationers in the Methodist church.

CORRESPONDENCE
Notes by the Way
[The Gospel Messenger, July 24, 1888]
I arrived in Dunn County, June 15, and have labored in the Irvin Creek and Chippewa Valley churches since that time. June 30 was their love feast, at David Stockman’s barn, in the Irvin Creek church. Brethren and sisters from Barron county and the Chippewa Valley church were present. The order was excellent. One man was baptized who had been a Catholic. One sister was reclaimed. I intend to remain with the Brethren of the Chippewa Valley church until July 23.

The Wisconsin field is a large one. I find work enough here to remain all summer and fall. My arrangements thus far, until I return home, are for nearly two months, and then some points are left out, which will, probably, be attended to this coming fall. We have the promise of Bro. John Sellers, of Bourbon, Ind., to come to our aid after harvest or sometime during the fall. I may be addressed, for the next few weeks, at Tyrone, Wis., in care of H. C. Baker.
D. M. Miller
Note: This was part of a larger article by D. M. Miller

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, July 31, 1888]
Stanton. —In the Chippewa Valley church, daughter of Levi Stanton, aged 4 years. Services June 29.
D. M. Miller

CORRESPONDENCE
Mission Work in Wisconsin
[The Gospel Messenger, December 11, 1888]
On Monday I started, in company with Bro. S. H. Baker, of Edson, Wis., for Chippewa Valley. I arrived the same evening at Bro. H. C. Baker’s, who has charge of that church, and commenced meetings at Peru school house. I had four meetings in that vicinity….
J. H. Sellers
Note: This was part of a larger article by J. H. Sellers’ on mission work in Wisconsin.

CORRESPONDENCE
From Augusta, Wis.
[The Gospel Messenger, May 7, 1889]
From here we go to Town 26, Range 12 west, in the south end of Dunn County, forty-two miles west and eighteen miles south. Bro. H. C. Baker lives here, in for the Chippewa Valley church. Here the writer located nearly fourteen years ago. Here our aged mother, sister and brothers reside. Here, as well as in other places, is a large field waiting to be cultivated….
Samuel H. Baker
Note: This was part of a larger article by Samuel H. Baker.

CORRESPONDENCE
[The Gospel Messenger, November 19, 1889]
Notice of Incorporation of the Trustees of the General Conference of the German Baptist or Brethren Church
________
In accordance with the resolutions offered by the Committee on Church Property, at the last Annual Meeting, 1889, and adopted by the Meeting, the following named persons were elected as given in the first article of said resolutions: L. W. Teeter, Hagerstown, Ind.; S. R. Zog, Mastersonville, Pa.; H. C. Early, Meyerhoeffer’s Store, Va.; Henry Frantz, New Carlisle, Ohio; H. C. Baker, Rock Falls, Wis.
Note: This is the beginning of a large article, mostly legal jargon, giving the above-named persons power as “Trustees of the General Conference of the German Baptist or Brethren Church.”

NOTES FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS
[The Gospel Messenger, June 24, 1890]
—Under date of June 14, Bro. Henry C. Baker, of Rock Falls, Wis., writes: “Last Saturday was our quarterly council. Everything passed off harmoniously. One who had wandered from the fold came back again. Others who had also strayed away made application to return. There have been six baptized here this spring, and there are good prospects for more.”

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, July 1, 1890]
Moser. —In the Chippewa Valley church, Wis., March 27, of asthma and La Grippe, Sister Hannah Moser, aged 83 years. In early life she gave her heart to God and, in holy baptism, dedicated herself to his service. Funeral services by the undersigned from the words, “Comfort one another with these words.”
Henry C. Baker

Peru Cemetery, Meridean, Dunn County, Wisconsin

[The Gospel Messenger, July 1, 1890]
Hower. —In the same church, Sister Hester Hower, aged 59 years, 6 months and 4 days. Deceased leaves a kind husband and five children to mourn their loss. She was born Nov. 21, 1830, and was married to George J. Hower, Sept. 2, 1849. She was a member of the Brethren church for thirty-five years. During her last illness of but one week’s duration, she was patient and faithful, and often talked to her children of the blessedness of embracing the religion of Christ. Since the death of our sister, one was baptized and one, that had wandered away, has returned to the fold. Funeral services by Bro. Henry C. Baker, from Rev. 14:13 to a large concourse of people.

Peru Cemetery, Meridean, Dunn County, Wisconsin

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, July 1, 1890]
Keck. —In the same congregation, April 16, of consumption, Elvira Keck, wife of John Keck, aged 23 years, 2 months and 11 days. Deceased leaves a husband, a babe, father, brother, and three sisters to mourn their loss. Funeral services by the undersigned from I Cor. 15:54 to a large concourse of people.
Note: This was Elvira Alice (Goss) Keck, daughter of John Sylvester Goss and wife Sophrona Kinney. She was born in Buffalo County, February 5, 1864 and died of tuberculosis April 16, 1890 in Peru Township.

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, July 1, 1890]
Hoover. —Also in the same congregation, May 18, infant child of friend Ephraim and Ida Hoover, aged three weeks. Funeral services by the undersigned.
Henry C. Baker

CORRESPONDENCE
From Rock Falls, Wis.
[The Gospel Messenger, December 2, 1890]
The members of the Chippewa Valley church have again enjoyed a very pleasant season of spiritual refreshing. Bro. D. M. Miller came among us Sept. 29. Our love feast occurred on the evening of Oct. 4. It was a very enjoyable meeting. Bro. Miller officiated. After preaching for us the following week, Bro. Miller and our home minister, Bro. H. C. Baker, went to Barron County to labor with the church there. After remaining there two weeks, they returned and preached two weeks in the Village of Rock Falls. Many good impressions were made. As a result of their labors at this place, six have united by baptism and two were reclaimed. One that had made the good confession was too ill to be baptized at present. All were heads of families except one, —the oldest daughter of Bro. Jonathan and Sister Emeline Moser, who has been sorely afflicted for some time. May the Lord restore her to health!

Bro. Miller labored earnestly and ably. The doctrines of the church were successfully sustained. He closed the meetings on Thursday evening Nov. 13. May he long be spared to labor in the noble cause he has espoused.
Katie Joyce.

CORRESPONDENCE
From the Chippewa Valley Church, Wis.
[The Gospel Messenger, April 14, 1891]
The members of this church have been enjoying a season of soul-refreshing meetings. Our home minister, Bro. H. C. Baker, commenced a series of meetings in what is known as the Stanton schoolhouse and continued for one week with good interest. Then he was requested to hold some meetings at the Hart schoolhouse where he preached eight sermons. The weather was pleasant and the sleighing good, consequently we had large crowds. Two were received by baptism and six more have made known their intention of uniting with the church soon. When baptism was administered to the two in question, it was estimated that there were two hundred people on the banks of the creek. We desire the prayer of God’s people everywhere, that the borders of Zion may be enlarged.
E. E. Joyce
March 30.

 [History of the Church of the Brethren Northern Illinois and Wisconsin]
“In 1891, they discussed building a meeting house, began the work the year following….” (Pp. 107-108)

CORRESPONDENCE
From Rock Falls, Wisconsin
[The Gospel Messenger, November 3, 1891]
Again we feel to thank God and take courage. Bro. D. M. Miller, of Illinois, came among us Sept. 8. He held forth the Word in the church at Rock Falls until Friday evening. Saturday evening was the time appointed for the love feast at Bro. Jacob Wheeler’s—one and a half miles south-east of Rock Falls. Thirty members surrounded the tables and partook of the sacred emblems. Bro. Miller officiated. The next morning, an old brother was anointed. At eleven o’clock, Bro. Miller again addressed an attentive audience in the church. The same evening, a love feast was held at Bro. H. E. Baker’s for the benefit of his aged and afflicted mother. The week following, Bro. Miller preached at the Stanton school house until Thursday evening, when he took the train to be with the Irvin Creek Brethren at their love feast.

He returned on Monday, preaching that evening at the Hart school house. Next day, he went to assist Bro. H. E. Baker, who had begun a series of meetings in the neighborhood where he now lives. Here the doctrine of the Brethren had never been preached. They continued the meetings until Friday evening.

On Saturday evening, a love feast was held at Magdalene Kecks’. Next day, Bro. Miller again commenced his labors at the Stanton school house, and continued until Thursday evening, when he preached his farewell sermon. Although there were no accessions to the church, yet we feel that much good was done. The cause has been much strengthened, members are built up, and everything is moving along nicely. Bro. Miller was kept quite busy during his stay with us. He preached twenty-four sermons and officiated at four love feasts, besides visiting among the people and adjusting matters generally. One sister remarked to him “that he was surely a peace-maker.”
Katie Joyce
Oct. 18.
Note: H. E. Baker is obviously H. C. Baker.

MATRIMONIAL
[The Gospel Messenger, January 26, 1892]
Diermyer-Moser. —At the home of the bride’s parents, Dec. 27, 1891, by Eld. H. C. Baker, Bro. John E. Diermyer and Miss Emma V. Moser, all of Pepin County, Wis.
Altha M. Baker

[The Gospel Messenger, August 30, 1892]
Bro. D. M. Miller, of Milledgeville, Ill., is now in the mission field in Wisconsin, expecting to remain about six weeks and, during that time, may attend three love feasts in that part of the state. His field of labor is at Red Cedar, Chippewa Valley, and Irvin Creek.
Note: Would this imply that Red Cedar and Chippewa Valley were separate congregations?

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, December 13, 1892]
Red Cedar, Wis.—Dec. 3, the members of the Chippewa Valley church convened for church council. All business was disposed of satisfactorily. We decided to hold a series of meetings in the near future. We expect Bro. Van Buren, of the Maple Grove church, to be with us. May we ever be found faithful! —Katie Joyce, Dec. 4.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, February 21, 1893]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.—Bro. T. D. Van Buren came to us Dec. 30. He remained until Jan. 16 and preached sixteen sermons. Although the weather was extremely cold and stormy, yet we had fair congregations. We can report no additions, but I know that the earnest preaching did the members much good. Sickness in the family of Eld. H. C. Baker prevented him from being with us much of the time, but I am glad to say that at this writing all have recovered. —Edward E. Joyce, Jan. 30.

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, July 11, 1893]
Hower. —In the Chippewa Valley church, Wis., June 17, 1893, George J. Hower. He was born Oct. 21, 1825. He was married Sept. 2, 1849, and shortly after, with his wife (who has preceded him to the spirit world about three years), united with the Brethren church. Bro. Hower served in the deacon’s office about thirty years. He leaves three sons and two daughters. Funeral services by the writer from Eccl. 12:6, 7.
H. C. Baker

Peru Cemetery, Meridean, Dunn County, Wisconsin

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, August 29, 1893]
Chippewa Valley Church, Wis.—Rejoice with us. Yesterday at our regular appointment, two, a husband and wife, were received into the church by confession and baptism. May they ever prove faithful, that others, seeing their good works may be convinced that there is a reality in religion! Others are counting the cost. —Katie Joyce, Red Cedar, Wis., Aug. 7.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, October17, 1893]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.—Sept. 2 we met in quarterly council. After meeting we repaired to the water’s side, where six dear young sisters were received into the church by baptism. May God give them grace sufficient to withstand all the fiery darts of the enemy! Oct. 7 will be our fall love feast, at which time we expect Bro. D. M. Miller and wife to be with us. On last Thursday, Sept. 28, Sister Katie Baker, wife of Eld. H. C. Baker, met with a very painful accident. She had started with a horse and buggy to visit some friends, and when about two miles from home the horse became frightened and tried to run away. Sister Baker jumped out of the buggy and got the horse by the bit, but it dragged her some distance and through a pair of bars in such a way as to break one of her lower limbs about six inches above the ankle. —Katie Joyce, Red Cedar, Wis.

[The Gospel Messenger, February 13, 1894]
The Brethren of the Chippewa Valley church, Wis., have their new meetinghouse nearly completed. Seven members have been added to the congregation during the last six months.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, February 13, 1894]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.—The members of this church have just passed through a series of enjoyable meetings. Eld. H. C. Baker commenced a series of meetings Jan. 14 and labored until the 19th. Then Bro. Van Buren, of Chippewa County, came to us and preached nine very interesting sermons. There was a good interest manifested. One dear soul came out to walk in newness of life. Others are near the kingdom. This makes seven additions to the church during the last six months. Our new meetinghouse is nearly completed. We feel to thank those who contributed towards its erection. —E. E. Joyce, Red Cedar, Wis., Jan. 30.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, November 6, 1894]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.—We held our love feast Oct. 13. Brethren S. H. Baker and T. D. Van Buren were with us. Bro. S. H. Baker officiated. There were forty that communed. In the afternoon of the day of our feast two precious souls made a request to unite with the church and were baptized in time to partake of the sacred emblems. We had a good meeting all through. The next day we had children’s meeting conducted by Bro. S. H. Baker; also song service, which the little folks seemed to enjoy very much. —J. A. Baker.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, June 18, 1895]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.— Our quarterly council occurred June 1. All business that came before the meeting was disposed of in a Christian-like way. We decided to hold our love feast sometime in September. We expect Bro. Franklin Myers, of Illinois, to commence a series of meetings at our meetinghouse June 11 – E. E. Joyce, Box 314, Durand, Wis.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, July 2, 1895]
Chippewa Valley, Wis. —According to previous arrangements, our dear Bro. Franklin Myers, of Illinois, came to us to hold a series of meetings. After he preached five soul cheering sermons, we, with him, concluded it would be better to postpone the meetings until in September. As a result of the short stay with us, one dear sister, a worthy lady, made the good choice and was immediately baptized. Our dear brother goes from here to the Irvin Creek congregation, and from there to Barron. We do hope that he may be able to come again. I find since he is gone that the people around rock Falls were disappointed that he could not preach a few times here in Rock Falls, as we have a house here open to all evangelical denominations. The house is offered, and the people desire preaching. —J. A. Baker, June 17.

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, July 11, 1895]
Baker. —Within the bounds of the Chippewa Valley church, Wis., Jan. 30, 1895, Sister Martha (Marshall) Baker, aged 78 years, 6 months, and 28 days. She was born in Lancaster County, Pa., and was married at the age of twenty-three years to Henry Baker, who preceded her to the spirit land about eight years. She had been a member of the Brethren church about forty years. She was the mother of eight children. Two of her sons, S. H.  and H. E.(sic) Baker, are elders. She had been a great sufferer for the past four years. She lived at the home of her only daughter, Sister Elizabeth Thomas, where she died. Two days before her death, she called for the elders of the church and was anointed.
E. E. Joyce

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, August 20, 1895]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.— On Wednesday, July 24, as Bro. H. C. Baker, and his sons, were going to dinner from the hayfield, his oldest son, Clarence, was walking behind, carrying a scythe on his shoulder. He caught his toe, and as he put his foot forward quick, to keep up, he drew the point of the scythe around the leg and cut a gash seven inches long. His father took his handkerchief and bound it up, got him home and called a doctor who rendered prompt assistance. At this writing the boy is doing well. At our church we have our regular appointments, and we also have a Sunday school with Bro. Ayers as Superintendent. We are always glad when the messenger reaches us. —J. A. Baker, Rock Falls, Wis., Aug. 5.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, October 29, 1895]
Chippewa Valley Church, Wis. —Bro. Frank Myers, of Mt. Carroll, Ill., came to us Sept. 24. He remained until the 31st. Sept. 28 was our Communion. Several members from adjoining congregations were with us and added greatly to the enjoyment of the meeting. Bro. Myers officiated. It was a very quiet and enjoyable meeting. Next day, at 10 o’clock, we had children’s meeting. Bro. Myers has won the hearts of the children in this vicinity. We also had meeting at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, and in the evening several of the members, including Bro. Myers, assembled at the home of Bro. D. B. Thomas to hold a love feast for the benefit of Sister Thomas, who is lying very sick at this writing. She is not expected to recover. Bro. Myers labored earnestly while with us and gave us many words of encouragement and advice. From here he went to Barron. —Katie and Edward Joyce, Durand, Wis., Oct. 13.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, December 21, 1895]
Chippewa Valley Church, Wis. —The Brethren met for council meeting Dec. 7, with fair attendance. All business passed off quietly. We decided to hold a series of meetings sometime in January. Sister Katie Joyce was elected Missionary Treasurer. —E. E. Joyce, Durand, Wis., Dec. 10.

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, January 4, 1896]
Thomas. —In the bounds of the Chippewa Valley church, Wis., Nov. 30, 1895, Sister Elizabeth Thomas (nee Baker) aged 55 years, 5 months, and 3 days. Deceased was born in Morgan County, Ohio, June 27, 1840. At the age of sixteen years, she united with the Brethren church. At the age of twenty-four years, she moved with her parents to Van Buren County, Mich., where she was united in marriage to D. B. Thomas, Nov. 1, 1868. In the fall of 1875, she, with her husband and family, moved to Dunn County, Wis. She was anointed in February, 1873, and again in September, 1895. She leaves a husband and four children. Funeral services were conducted by Eld. T. D. Van Buren, of Chippewa County.
Katie Joyce

Peru Cemetery, Meridean, Dunn County, Wisconsin

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, January 4, 1896]
Cramer. —In the bounds of the Chippewa Valley church, Nov. 23, 1895, friend Jonathan Cramer, aged 65 years, 10 months, and 12 days. A wife and six children are left. Funeral services were conducted by Eld. H. C. Baker.
E. E. Joyce

CORRESPONDENCE
From Durand, Wis.
[The Gospel Messenger, March 21, 1896]
We have just closed one of the most enjoyable series of meetings ever held in this congregation. At our last council meeting, we decided to hold a series of meetings sometime in February if we could get help. Accordingly, we wrote to two elders to be with us, but both failed to come. Then our home minister, Eld. H. C. Baker, commenced preaching Feb. 23, and continued until March 5, preaching, in all, thirteen sermons. From the start, there was a deep interest manifested. The church was well filled each night with attentive listeners. Twenty came out on the Lord’s side.

March 7 was our regular council meeting, after which we repaired to the water, where the ordinance of baptism was administered to ten of the applicants. Among the number were a husband and wife; the rest are some of the finest young people in our neighborhood, ranging from sixteen to twenty-three years of age. The other applicants will be baptized later on. Some could not be baptized at present on account of ill health. Bro. Henry and wife contracted severe colds, which necessitated closing the meetings too soon. We feel that others are counting the cost. During the meetings we had good order. A very large crowd gathered at the water to witness the ordinance of baptism. All seemed impressed with the solemnity of the occasion. Give God the praise!
E. E. Joyce.
March 8.

[The Gospel Messenger, March 21, 1896]
The Brethren at Durand, Wisconsin, failing to get help from abroad in a series of meetings, went earnestly to work with their own force. Bro. H. C. Baker did the preaching. There were twenty applicants for membership. This is another proof of what may be done by earnest efforts upon the part of the home ministers, assisted by the united efforts and prayers of the whole church. Let our home ministers take courage from these and other reports.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, April 4, 1896]
Chippewa Valley Church, Wis. —March 14, a special church meeting was called in order to finish up business left over from last meeting. One brother that had wandered away from the fold was reclaimed, and now, like one of old, he can say, “As for me and my house we will serve the Lord.” We are glad to say that this church is in a working condition. We decided to hold a love feast June 13, and another sometime in the fall. —E. E. Joyce, Durand, Wis., March 20.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, April 4, 1896]
Durand, Wis. – Yesterday we organized our Sunday school with E. E. Joyce, Superintendent. We also have prayer meeting every Sunday evening, and a singing class each Saturday evening. We use the Brethren’s Hymnals. Bro. H. C. Baker is our singing teacher. —E. E. Joyce, March 30.

fALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, April 25, 1896]
Diermyer —In the Chippewa Valley church, Wis., April 2, 1896, Sister Emma V. Diermyer, aged 23 years, 2 months and 11 days. She was the daughter of Bro. Jonathan and Sister Emeline Moser. She leaves a sorrowing husband and a little son, three years old. Funeral services by Eld. S. H. Baker.
Katie Joyce

Peru Cemetery, Meridean, Dunn County, Wisconsin

CORRESPONDENCE
From Wisconsin
[The Gospel Messenger, June 27, 1896]
I did not know who the Mission Board of Northern Illinois had sent to this district (Chippewa Valley) until I arrived (May 23); then I learned Bro. Jacob Delp would be here a week later. I held a week’s meetings in their meetinghouse until Bro. Delp arrived. We continued until the evening of June 14. The feast was the 13th. Over sixty members communed. We had the best of order and attention, but no lights were needed. The days at this season are longer here than in Illinois. We closed the services about eight o’clock. We had council meeting June 6. There were five applicants May 30. One was reclaimed at the feast. A man and wife were restored. These two were from the church over fourteen years. They withdrew when disorder existed here, but retained their integrity and were well thought of. When I visited them, I found they had no money to buy clothes to attend meetings, but wished to be again in fellowship. So Bro. Delp and I walked over. I gave them $5 to get clothes. They would not take it as a gift, but on condition that they might pay it back again as soon as they are able. There was joy in the family of God when they returned. Some, who had returned previously, were especially elated. Bro. Delp returned home yesterday, the 15th. I am staying until harvest, several weeks later. We visited from house to house. The whole community is roused up; a religious feeling is felt everywhere. Four have been baptized and three reclaimed. There are some applicants and a number intend to unite with the church between now and the fall love feast, which will be before October. I am now about nine miles from the meetinghouse.

This church has a number of intelligent young members, some of them school teachers. Bro. H. C. Baker, their elder, has the confidence of the members and outsiders. They yield a powerful influence and have a bright future. It was their desire I should be with them. They had very little help from Illinois since the fall of ’93, when wife and I were here. Last winter, Henry C. Baker held a series of meetings by request of his church, and ten were baptized and one restored, with ten more applicants. There was opposition inside to the membership of some applicants. I was acquainted with the objections and we got them removed. Bro. Delp is the man for this Wisconsin field. He takes well and his counsel is good. He is mild, yet firm. He comes down on a level with the poor. Bro. Delp will devote the rest of his days to the mission work, and we need him.
D. M. Miller.
Rock Falls, Wis., June 16.

[The Gospel Messenger, January 23, 1897]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.—We expect to enjoy a series of meetings soon to be conducted by Bro. C. P. Rowland, of Illinois. He is, at present, preaching for the Irvin Creek congregation. We have regular preaching at our meetinghouse every two weeks, and prayer meeting every Sunday evening. —J. A. Baker, Rock Falls, Wis., Jan. 8.

Notes from our Correspondents
[The Gospel Messenger, February 20, 1897]
Chippewa Valley Church, Wis. —Last night we closed one of the most interesting and profitable series of meetings ever held in this congregation. Bro. C. P. Rowland, of Lanark, Ill., came to us Jan. 13, and remained until Feb. 4. The house was well filled nearly every night, the severity of the weather notwithstanding. The best of order prevailed, and many deep and lasting impressions were made. Bro. Rowland met with some opposition from the Seventh Day Adventists, yet he did not shun to declare the whole truth. He preached twenty-six able sermons, and as a result of his labors ten were buried with Christ in baptism, and ten applicants await baptism. They ranged in age from fourteen to sixty-seven years. The members have been built up and encouraged to press on. There has been much searching of the Scriptures by those outside to see if these things be so. Many are counting the cost of their salvation. Bro. Rowland goes from here to the Maple Grove church. May success crown his efforts! —Katie Joyce, Durand, Wis., Feb. 5.
Note: C. P. Rowland was Collin Puterbaugh Rowland (1849-1920).

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, May 1, 1897]
Chippewa Valley. —Eld. C. Hope, of Kansas, came to us April 11, and has been preaching for us each evening and also at our Sunday morning meetings. He has only preached one time in his native tongue, but is doing a good deal of work among the Norwegians by going from house to house, forming acquaintances and leaving his tracts. As far as he has gone, he has done work that he need not be ashamed of. Our elder, H. C. Baker, has not been very well for some time; also his wife has only had the privilege of being to but one meeting since Bro. Hope came here, on account of sickness. —J. A. Baker, Rock Falls, Wis., April 22.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, May 22, 1897]
Chippewa Valley. —April 10, Bro. Christian Hope came to our church to labor among the Swedes and Danes, having been sent by the General Missionary Board. April 22, Bro. W. L. Bingaman, of Laplace, Ill., came to his assistance, and they are now laboring together for the good of the cause. Bro. Bingaman is soliciting for the Orphanage at Smyrna and lecturing on Bible Lands. His costumes and relics of Bible Lands are interesting and instructive, and of great benefit to those interested in Bible study. From here they go to Door County, Wisconsin. —E. E. Joyce, Durand, Wis., May 14.

[The Gospel Messenger, June 26, 1897]
When last heard from, Bro. C. P. Rowland was engaged in a series of meetings in the Chippewa Valley church, Wisconsin. Two confessed Christ. Their feast was last Saturday.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, October 9, 1897]
Chippewa Valley. —Bro. C. P. Rowland came to us Sept. 11, and preached, in all, five soul cheering sermons at the church, and four at a neighboring schoolhouse. The interest and attendance were good. At our council, Sept. 20, we decided to hold our love feast Oct. 9. We expect Bro. Rowland to be with us. —Carrie M. Baker, Sept. 21

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, October 30, 1897]
Chippewa Valley. —Our communion meeting was held Oct. 9. Visiting ministers, C. P. Rowland and S. H. Baker, were with us. Bro. Rowland officiated. An excellent sermon on “Baptism” was delivered on the day following by the above brethren. —Carrie M. Baker, Oct. 11.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, January 8, 1898]
Chippewa Valley. —This church met in council Dec. 4. Sufficient money was raised to defray our indebtedness on our church house, for which we feel very thankful. We had Thanksgiving services, after which a collection was taken for the World-wide Mission. —Carrie M. Baker, East Pepin, Wis., Dec. 6.

ALBANY
[Eau Claire Leader, January 28, 1898]
Great Caesar Major why don’t you come out to some of our meetings? I think you would make a fine Dunkard. All the churches are doing well. We had some grand revival meetings round here. Elder Joyce officiating and Deacon Baker assisting. I tell you they can stir ‘em up, and don’t you forget it. They went over to Dunnville and preached Saturday night and all day Sunday, and the sin they drove out and the converts they raked in was refreshing. They came home feeling in good spirits, and they say they are going to try it again in two weeks. The Dunkard church has cast aside its old seats and has some brand new ones.
Note: This was obviously written by a non-church member. The congregation no longer identified as “Dunkards.”

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, February 26, 1898]
Chippewa Valley. —Bro. C. P. Rowland came to us Feb. 11, and is preaching each evening in his usual earnest manner. He is greeted by full houses of attentive listeners. We have our church house newly seated and well lighted, and I believe all appreciate it. The order is commendable. All the members seem active in trying to make this series of meetings both interesting and profitable. —Katie Joyce, Red Cedar, Wis., Feb. 14.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, March 5, 1898]
Chippewa Valley. —Our meetings closed Feb. 24. Bro. C. P. Rowland delivered in all fifteen sermons. Two precious souls were made to forsake sin and walk with the people of God, while the church in general is wonderfully built up in that most holy faith. —Carrie M. Baker, East Pepin, Wis., Feb. 25.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, March 26, 1898]
Chippewa Valley. —We met in quarterly council March 12. A great deal of business came before the meeting, which was agreeably disposed of. We reorganized our Sunday school, which is to begin the first Sunday in April, with Bro. J. A. Baker as Superintendent, and Bro. Warren Ayres, Assistant. We chose Bro. E. E. Joyce as delegate to District Meeting. —Carrie M. Baker, East Pepin, Wis., March 14.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, May 14, 1898]
Chippewa Valley. —In company with Bro. H. C. Baker we just returned from the District Meeting of Northern Illinois and Wisconsin held in the Hickory Grove church, Ill. The love feast the evening before was highly edifying. We really enjoyed our sojourn among the dear members in northern Illinois. They know how to make strangers feel at home. May 1, after services, it was announced that our aged sister, who had gone with the Old Order Brethren, wished to be taken back into the church, and to be anointed, which was attended to that afternoon by Eld. H. C. Baker and the writer in the presence of several members and a few outsiders. The aged sister is in very poor health. —E. E. Joyce, Red Cedar, Wis., May 2.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, May 28, 1898]
Chippewa Valley. —We held our council May 14. The church in general is in a better working condition than ever before. We chose Eld. H. C. Baker delegate to Annual Meeting. Our Sunday school is prospering nicely. The attendance is very good. —Carrie M. Baker, East Pepin, May 16.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, September 17, 1898]
Chippewa Valley. —Our church meeting occurred yesterday. There was a fair representation of members present. An aged sister applied for baptism. She was formerly a member of the “Old Order Brethren.” We appointed our love feast for Oct. 15. —Katie Joyce,  Red Cedar, Wis., Sept. 4.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, December 10, 1898]
Chippewa Valley. —Yesterday we had Thanksgiving services in the church. Eld. H. C. Baker preached an excellent sermon. A missionary collection resulted in raising $2.41. We expect to hold a series of meetings some time during the winter. —E. E. Joyce, Red Cedar, Wis., Nov. 25.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, January 7, 1899]
Chippewa Valley. —Dec. 3 we met in church council. A large amount of business was transacted, and all was disposed of in a Christian-like manner. We had decided to have an evergreen Sunday school. Bro. Edward Davis is our Superintendent. On Christmas day, we had an interesting meeting. Some of the topics were handled in a very able manner. Our series of meetings is to begin Jan 8. Bro. Honberger is to assist us. —E. E. Joyce, Red Cedar, Wis., Dec. 26.
Note: Bro. Honberger was Samuel Arthur Honberger.
This year (1899) the Greenwood Church of the Brethren in Door County, Wisconsin was disorganized, and many of those members, with the advice of Henry C. Baker, moved to either the church in Stanley Wisconsin or to East Pepin, Wisconsin. Among the notable families that moved to East Pepin was the Henry J. Cripe family. Apparently there were enough member immigrants to East Pepin that it warranted moving the Chippewa Valley church to that location. Most future correspondence by this congregation to the Gospel Messenger came from that location.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, March 18, 1899]
Chippewa Valley. —Everything passed off pleasantly at our council March 4. We decided to begin our series of meetings March 11, to be conducted by our home elder, Bro. Honberger. We will hold our love feast in June. We also granted letters to our young minister and his wife, who are going to locate in the Barron congregation. —Carrie M. Baker, East Pepin, Wis., March 6.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, April 8, 1899]
Chippewa Valley. —Bro. Honberger came to us March 11. On account of stormy weather, the meetings did not begin until March 13. He remained with us until March 22. Our home elder, H. C. Baker, conducted the meetings alone from Saturday night until Sunday evening. Three came out on the Lord’s side, and others are nearing the kingdom. —Carrie M. Baker, East Pepin, Wis., March 27.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, April 29, 1899]
Cripe. —In the Chippewa Valley church, Wis., April 4, 1899, Ivan Waldo, infant son of Brother George and Sister Viola Cripe, aged 1 month and 8 days. Services by Bro. H. C. Baker. Interment in Rock Falls cemetery.
Carrie M. Baker

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, May 27, 1899]
Davis. —In the Chippewa Valley congregation, Wis., May 5, 1899, of pneumonia, Sister Amelia Davis, wife of Bro. David Davis, aged 62 years. Deceased was born in New Jersey in 1837. She was married to David Davis in 1855. She was the mother of seven children, five of whom survive. She united with the Brethren church nine years ago, and has lived a Christian life ever since. Her presence in the church, as well as in the home, will be sadly missed. Services by Eld. H. C. Baker from Luke 4:18, 19.
Altha M. Baker

Peru Cemetery, Meridean, Dunn County, Wisconsin

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, July 1, 1899]
Chippewa Valley. —Our communion was held June 17. Although the attendance was small, and no visiting members, we had an enjoyable feast. We expected brethren Rowland and Honberger, but were sorry to learn they could not be with us. Bro. H. C. Baker officiated. Just before the services, one was baptized. —Carrie M. Baker, Caryville, Wis., June 18.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, September 2, 1899]
Chippewa Valley. —Bro. C. P. Rowland made us a short visit while on his way to the Barron congregation. He preached one sermon at our schoolhouse, which was greatly appreciated and well attended. He also preached two sermons at the church. His sermons are interesting and instructive. —Carrie M. Baker, East Pepin, Wis., Aug. 23.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, November 4, 1899]
Chippewa Valley. —Bro. C. P. Rowland commenced meetings at the church Oct. 16, and continued them each evening during the week. Much good was done. Our love feast occurred Oct. 21. Brethren Rowland and S. H. Baker were with us, also other visiting members from adjoining churches. Bro. Rowland officiated. —Carrie M. Baker, Caryville, Wis., Oct. 25.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, March 24, 1900]
Chippewa Valley. —Bro. C. P. Rowland preached some excellent discourses during our three weeks series of meetings. One was added by baptism. We also held our council while Bro. Rowland was here. Our communion will be June 16. We also reorganized our Sunday school to begin the second quarter. We have a Bible reading every Sunday evening and prayer meeting each Thursday evening. —Carrie M. Baker, East Pepin, Wis., March 14.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, August 25, 1900]
Chippewa Valley. —Our feast of June 16 will long be remembered as being one among the best of meetings. Love and union prevailed. Brethren C. P. Rowland and S. H. Baker were the ministers with us. Bro. C. P. Rowland officiated. Next morning, we met at the church again for public worship; preaching by Bro. C. P. Rowland followed by S. H. Baker. After preaching, a vote was taken to ascertain if the church was willing to call a brother to the ministry, as our elder feels the need of help, he being alone in the work. The decision was for no election at present. We had preaching at 2 P. M. and 7 P. M. by Bro. C. P. Rowland. Bro. S. H. Baker, of Maple Grove, had to leave us immediately after morning meeting; received a call to come home to preach the funeral of an aged sister. We very much regret that he could not be with us over Sunday. Bro. Rowland left us Monday morning, June 18, for other fields of labor. —H. J. Cripe, East Pepin, Wis., June 20.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, October 27, 1900]
Chippewa Valley. —Our love feast for Oct. 13 is past. We had a very good meeting. All appeared to work together for good. Thirty-eight members communed, and quite a number of spectators were present. Ministers present: C. P. Rowland, S. H. Baker, and our elder H. C. Baker. Bro. Rowland officiated. —H. J. Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., Oct. 16.

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, November 3, 1900]
Cramer. —In the Chippewa Valley church, Wis., Sept. 23, 1900, Sister Jane Cramer, age 70 years, 8 months and 6 days. Services by H. C. Baker.
H. J. Cripe

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, March 16, 1901]
Chippewa Valley. —Our quarterly meeting occurred March 2. Much business came before the meeting which was disposed of in a Christian manner. Our next love feast was appointed for June 14. Our Sunday school was reorganized at the church and will be superintended by Bro. Warren Ayres. We also decided to organize a Sunday school in the vicinity of East Pepin for the benefit of the Brethren there; also a series of meetings was agreed upon for some time this spring if the weather permit. —H. J. Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., March 4.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, April 13, 1901]
Chippewa Valley. —Our meetings closed last Sunday, March 24. The stormy weather and drifted roads prevented people from attending meeting. We had small attendance, but good meetings conducted by our elder, H. C. Baker. We organized our Sunday school, March 17, to be superintended by Bro. J. A. Baker and the writer. Our love feast will be June 8 instead of June 14. —H. J. Cripe, East Pepin, Wis., March 25.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, June 15, 1901]
Chippewa Valley. —Our quarterly council preparatory to our love feast, June 8, was held Saturday, June 1. All passed off very pleasantly. We expect to have a ministerial meeting on day of feast, commencing at 9:30 A. M., and closing at 4 P. M. Our Sabbath schools at the church and also at Pepin are progressing nicely; also Bible reading very interesting and instructive. —H. J. Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., June 3.

FROM CHIPPEWA VALLEY CHURCH, WIS.
[The Gospel Messenger, June 29, 1901]
Our love feast and ministerial meeting on last Saturday were a success and very much enjoyed by all present, although Brother and Sister Baker’s (elder’s) daughter was taken sick on Tuesday, before the meeting, so our sister, having the care of the sick daughter, could not be with us at the feast. This was a disappointment to all the brethren and sisters present. Quite a number of members from Barron and Maple Grove churches were with us. Also the ministerial force was well represented. Bro. E. E. Joyce officiated.

Just as we were preparing the tables for the children and friends to have some refreshments, it was announced to us that there was an applicant for baptism. The crowd started for the little brook a short distance north of the church. A good many of the children and friends went away from the table without super to witness the scene.

After baptism was administered, we all repaired to the church and made ready for the supper and communion. Fifty-four surrounded the Lord’s table.

On Sunday morning, we met for Sunday school, which was well attended. After Sunday school, we had preaching by Bro. C. P. Rowland, Bro. Wassam, and Bro. Hall, from Barron. After dinner, which was served at the church, I was decided to hold an election for a minister. But there was no choice. So ended one of the best meetings we ever attended.
H. J. Cripe
East Pepin, Wis., June, 10.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, October 12, 1901]
Chippewa Valley. —Our love feast passed off very pleasantly. Bro. C. P. Rowland officiated. Owing to the rain and sickness, not all the members were present. There were several from adjoining churches. Bro. H. J. Cripe has been seriously ill for the past week, but is slowly recovering. Bro. C. P. Rowland is holding a series of meetings at the East Pepin schoolhouse. Since our last report, we have received two by letter. —Altha M. Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., Sept. 30.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, January, 25, 1902]
Chippewa Valley. —We have just closed a short but very interesting series of meetings conducted by Bro. C. C. Price, of Illinois. Sunday he gave us a missionary sermon, and a collection for the world-wide mission resulted in $6.36. He went to the Irvin Creek church, where he will hold a few meetings. We all feel built up in the inner man. —H. J. Cripe, East Pepin, Wis., Jan. 13.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, March 29, 1902]
Chippewa Valley. —We met in quarterly council March 15. Bro. H. C. Baker, our elder, was chosen as delegate to district Meeting. The church decided to hold a love feast June 14, commencing at 4 P. M. We also reorganized Sunday school at the church. Bro. Warren Ayers superintendent. —H. J. Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., March 17.

DRAMMEN
(Special Correspondence)
[The Eau Claire Weekly Telegram, August 7, 1902]
Rev. H. C. Baker delivered a good sermon at the school house last Sunday.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, September 13, 1902]
Chippewa Valley. —We held our quarterly council to-day Aug. 30. We decided to hold our love feast Oct. 18. —H. J. Cripe, East Pepin, Wis., Aug. 30.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, December 13, 1902]
Chippewa Valley. —Our love feast, which was appointed for Oct. 18 and postponed for an indefinite time on account of smallpox, was held Nov. 29. We had a very good meeting. Twenty-two surrounded the Lord's table. On Thanksgiving day, we had a missionary and Thanksgiving meeting. Collection, $3.60. The weather being inclement, very few came out. —H. J. Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., Dec. 1.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, January 24, 1903]
Chippewa Valley. —Our series of meetings, which commenced on New Year's evening, conducted by our elder, H. C. Baker, is well attended with good interest. One applicant for baptism. On account of the death of our dear old Bro. Joyce in the Barron church, our meetings will have to stop for a few days, as our elder was called to preach his funeral. On his return home the meetings will be continued indefinitely. —H. J. Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., June 14.

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, January 31, 1903]
Henderson, Joyce, died in the Barron church, Wis., Jan. 8, 1903, aged 82 years and 2 months. He had been a great sufferer from a complication of diseases. He united with the Brethren church about thirty years ago, was twice married, of eleven children, six sons are living; also his aged wife ....is left to mourn his death. Funeral services conducted by Eld. H. C. Baker, from Thess. 4: 13, 14.
Katie Joyce
Note: Henderson was his first name.

Wayside Cemetery, Barron, Barron County, Wisconsin

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, March 28, 1903]
Ayers, Sarah, nee Camberlan, born in New Jersey, died Feb. 28, 1903, aged 88 years and 11 months. She was the mother of nine children. Four are left to mourn their loss. Funeral discourse by Eld. H. C. Baker.
H. J. Cripe
Note: “Camberlan” is how her name is spelled in this article. Other sources have it as Chamberlain.

EAST PEPIN
[The Mondovi Herald, 1903]
The Dunkards have the frame built to their new church.

A church social was held at the home of Ira Isham last Friday evening. A very large crowd was present and the receipts were about $14.00.

ANTHONY
[The Mondovi Herald, 1903]
H. C. Baker went to Eau Claire Tuesday to buy a bill of lumber for an addition to the church.

ANTHONY
(Special Correspondence)
[The Daily Telegram, (Eau Claire) October 8, 1903]
On last Sunday at the Brethren church there was a big crowd to listen to the dedicatory sermon which was ably delivered by Eld. D. M. Miller of Milledgeville, Ill.
__________
On Saturday evening before the Brethren held their love feast, Eld. Miller officiating, they organized a Sunday School with J. A. Baker as superintendent.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, October 17, 1903]
Chippewa Valley church met in council Oct. 1. Our love feast was held Oct. 3. Brethren D. M. Miller and Israel Stees, both of Northern Illinois, were with us. Several members from the Maple Grove congregation were present. Oct. 4 our new church was dedicated. Bro. Miller preached the dedicatory sermon, and Bro. Stees preached to us in the evening. A collection was taken which resulted in $5.25 for missionary purposes. Bro. Stees leaves today. Bro. miller will stay and preach to us each evening this week. —Carrie M. Baker, Mondovi, Wis., Oct. 5.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, June 20, 1914]
Chippewa Valley. —Our series of meetings, conducted by Bro. C. P. Rowland, of Lanark, Ill., began May 23. He was with us two weeks. Four were received into the church by baptism. May 30, we held our love feast. Bro. Rowland officiated, assisted by our elder, Bro. H. C. Baker. The meeting was well attended and proved a most enjoyable one to all present. —Lillian M. Cripe, R. D. 5, Mondovi, Wis., June 10.

[The Gospel Messenger, October 17, 1914]
Bro. C. P. Rowland, of Lanark, Ill., is now engaged in a very interesting revival in the Chippewa Valley church, Wis.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, November 21, 1914]
Chippewa Valley. —Bro. C. P. Rowland recently closed a series of meetings in our church. He preached twenty-six sermons. There were six accessions to the church, and two were restored. Bro. J. G. Royer, who was with us at our love feast and over Sunday, gave us a good sermon and talked to the Sunday school, which we appreciated. —C. L. Salsbury, Mondovi, Wis., Nov. 4.

FALLEN ASLEEP
[The Gospel Messenger, January 16, 1915]
Moser, Bro. Jonathan, of Rock Falls, Wis., born Dec. 14, 1840, died of cancer of the stomach, Nov. 7, 1914, in the bounds of the Chippewa Valley congregation, Wis. He was a highly respected member of the Church of the Brethren for about twenty-seven years. —C. L. Salsbury, Mondovi, Wis.

Peru Cemetery, Meridean, Dunn County, Wisconsin

VOICE OF THE PEOPLE
A Correction
[The Eau Claire Leader, April 8, 1915]
To the Leader:
We notice in the Saturday Leader April 3rd, an item from a Chicago paper with photo of Miss Florence Maxwell and Rev. I. B. Trout of the Brethren Church: We wish to state that I. B. Trout is a minister of the Church of the Brethren and not a Brethren minister at all. The Brethren have their publishing house at Ashland, Ohio. The Church of the Brethren at Elgin, Ill.
J. A. Baker
Pastor of Brethren Church.
Spooner, Wis.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, April 10, 1915]
Chippewa Valley. —Our love feast will be held May 29 in Chippewa Valley, to be preceded by a week’s series of meetings conducted by the home elder, Bro. H. C. Baker. We cordially invite all to enjoy these spiritual meetings with us. —C. L. Salsbury, Mondovi, Wis., March 31.

[The Gospel Messenger, July 24, 1915]
Bro. J. G. Royer, who is now with the Chippewa Valley congregation, Wis., says that he is happy because he can be about his Father’s business. Bro. H. C. Baker has charge of this congregation, and the Lord’s work is prospering, eighteen having been received into fellowship during the last eight months. Two more applied for membership at the all-day meeting of last Saturday. Bro. Royer thinks that the outlook for others is good.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, December 18, 1915]
Chippewa Valley church met in council Dec. 4. Eld. H. C. Baker presided. We had a very enjoyable meeting. We decided to hold a series of meetings sometime in the near future. Sunday-school officers were elected as follows: Bro. Ed. Davis, Superintendent; Sister Nona Davis, Secretary and Treasurer; the writer, Messenger correspondent. A Sisters' Aid Society was also organized, to meet twice a month, with Sister Ida Salsbury as President. —John Cripe,  R. D. 5, Mondovi, Wis., Dec. 8.

DRAMMEN
[Eau Claire Leader, Sunday, December 19, 1915]
Mrs. Herbert Root of Cumberland is visiting her parents Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Baker.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, January 22, 1916]
Chippewa Valley. —On Sunday evening, Dec. 26, a large and attentive crowd listened to a very interesting Christmas program given by the Sunday-school pupils and other young people in the neighborhood. It consisted of songs, recitations, drills, dialogues, etc., and was thoroughly enjoyed by all. After the program, all were given a treat. —John Cripe, R. D. 5, Mondovi, Wis., Jan.8.

SISTERS’ AID SOCIETIES
[The Gospel Messenger, January 1, 1916]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.—The sisters of the Chippewa Valley church met at Bro. H. C. Baker’s Dec. 8, 1915, to organize a Sisters’ Aid Society. Officers elected are as follows: Sister Louis Saulsbury, President; Sister May Cripe, Vice-president; Sister Alice Peden, Secretary; Sister Florence Saulsbury, Treasurer. Officers were elected for the next three months. —Sister Alice Peden, Mondovi, Wis., Dec. 9.
Note: From History of the Church of the Brethren Northern Illinois and Wisconsin: “On December 15, 1915, thirteen women met in the Henry C. Baker home, organized an Aid Society and chose Ida Salsbury as president, May Cripe as vice president, Alice Peden as secretary and Florence Salsbury as treasurer. They adopted as their projects serving lunches, piecing quilts, knotting comforters and doing needlework. Among their chief interests are the home church program, missions, Bethany Biblical Seminary and various home charities. They estimate that they have contributed some $2,400 during the years.”

CORRESPONDENCE
The Wisconsin Churches
[The Gospel Messenger, December 2, 1916]
I spent a few days with the members of the Chippewa Valley church. This congregation is located in West Central Wisconsin. Bro. C. P. Rowland was here in a revival. Some were baptized. I attended a number of the meetings and preached once. The members here are somewhat isolated, being nine miles from any railroad. As they are somewhat limited in means, they are hindered from visiting the sister churches. It would be a helpful thing if they could associate more with other congregations. It would broaden their vision and make them more charitable and forbearing. The young people could associate with members of the church more, and would be able to choose companions for life in the church. Eld. H. C. Baker presides, and has been in charge for many years. The work is almost more than he can care for, with his advanced years and failing health. Brethren Root and Salsbury are his assistants in the ministry. The time is not far in the future when more ministerial help will be appreciated. The soil throughout this section is sandy—well adapted to fruit and dairying….
John Heckman
Polo, Ill., Nov. 18.
Note: This is part of a larger article by John Heckman on his visits to the Wisconsin churches. He certainly saw the handwriting on the wall so to speak, for less than two months later Henry Clay Baker passed away quite suddenly of a stroke.

CORRESPONDENCE
[The Gospel Messenger, February 3, 1917]
ELDER HENRY CLAY BAKER
Henry Clay Baker was born in Wayne county, Ind., Oct. 30, 1848. He was the sixth of a family of nine children, of whom three brothers survive him. When he was fifteen years of age, he, with his parents, moved to Michigan, where he lived until he was twenty-three. June 23, 1872, he was married to Katie A. Diermyer,  of North Liberty, Ind. Here they lived until January, 1878, when they moved to their present location, East Pepin, Wis. To them were born five daughters and four sons, all of whom survive him. The end came suddenly, of apoplexy, Jan. 10, 1917.

Deceased has lived an exemplary Christian life for forty-five years. He has served in the ministry for over thirty-seven years. He was elder in charge of the Chippewa Valley church for over thirty years. He was appointed one of the trustees for the whole Brotherhood, at home and abroad, in which capacity he served until the time of his death, having signed some official documents from Denmark during his last illness.

I have known and labored in the ministry with Bishop Baker for twenty-two years. He always had the welfare of the church at heart. He was an earnest and effectual minister. He served as an elder for thirty years. Our work was very pleasant and, we trust, profitable for the Master. The church here will greatly feel their loss, as he was their bishop. He leaves two young ministers as his successors. He had the respect of the entire community. Services by Bro. J. M. Myers, of Stanley, Wis., and the writer. Text, Rev. 14:13.
C. P. Rowland
Lanark, Illinois.
Note: The two young ministers spoken of in the last paragraph were Charles Lewis Salsbury and Lester Root.

Baker, Henry C.—1848-?
Born in St. Joseph County, Ind., Oct. 1; son Henry Baker; married Katie Diermyer, June 23, 1872. United Ch. Of B. Came to Dunn County, Wis., Chippewa neighborhood, 1878. When Chippewa Valley church organized, Sept. 14, 1879, he was called to the ministry. He was a man of influence, a natural leader. He was elder of several congregations and did some evangelistic work. His wife was a good church worker (p. 149). Brethren Northern Illinois and Wisconsin 1941

BAKER FAMILY
[History of Pepin County]
Henry Clay Baker was born on October 30, 1848 in Wayne County, Indiana, a son of Henry and Martha (Marshall) Baker. Henry Baker was of Pennsylvania German descent, his family having migrated from eastern Pennsylvania through Virginia, western Pennsylvania and Ohio. The parents of Martha Baker, Andrew and Elizabeth Marshall, had emigrated from Northern Ireland to Pennsylvania in the early 1800s. Henry and Martha Baker moved their family from Indiana to Van Buren County, Michigan, about 1860. Henry C. Baker learned blacksmithing as a young man and was engaged in that business in North Liberty, Indiana, where he married Katie A. Diermyer on June 23, 1872. About 1876, Henry C. Baker moved his family to Peru Township, Dunn county, Wisconsin. Then about 1890, he purchased a farm in section 24 of Albany Township, Pepin County, Wisconsin, where he lived until his death on January 10, 1917. Henry C. and Katie A. Baker had the following children: Altha, born 1873 (married David Cripe); Weltha, born 1876 (married Herbert Root); Carrie, born 1878 (married Albert Ramberg); Clarence, born 1880; Earl, born 1882 (married Susan Utsinger); Erwin, born 1883 (married Minnie Kewin); Myrtle, born 1885 (married Thomas Cook and Albert Serum); Marietta, born 1887 (married Earl Cook); Floyd, born 1891 (married Emma Mikesell).
At the age of 21, Henry C. Baker was baptized into the family faith, that of the German Baptist Brethren church, now known as the Church of the Brethren. In 1879, the Chippewa Valley Church of the Brethren was organized in Peru Township, Dunn county, and Henry C. Baker was elected as minister of the congregation.

In those days, following the custom of the Brethren and other German Protestant denominations, the ministers were elected by the congregation from persons of good character who had a natural talent for preaching. Higher education and theological seminary training were not necessarily prerequisites to a pastoral ministry. These ministers supported themselves by their own labors and received little or no monetary compensation for their church work. Henry C. Baker came into this type of ministry at the age of 30, and was soon advanced to the eldership or highest degree of the ministry in the Church of the Brethren. The Chippewa Valley Church remained in Dunn county until 1903, but because Henry C. Baker and several families of his congregation had moved to Albany Township, Pepin County, the church was relocated there on a small tract of hillside land in section 11. Henry C. Baker remained as resident minister of this church until his death in 1917. The Chippewa Valley Church has been active in the community until recently, when it was forced to close because of dwindling membership.

Henry C. Baker not only served his local church but also did extensive mission preaching farther north in Wisconsin. He was instrumental in organizing and leading several other Brethren congregations in this pioneer area. He was the guiding force of the only church to be located in the East Pepin area, and his influence on this community cannot be measured (pp. 53-54).

WISCONSIN
 [The Gospel Messenger, March 10, 1917]
Chippewa Valley church met in council Feb. 24, Bro. C. L. Salsbury presiding. There was a good representation of the members present. A finance committee was elected. The report of the annual visit was given, and the church was found to be in good working order. We decided to hold a love feast May 5, at 7 P. M. The members at this place keenly feel the deep loss of our elder, Bro. H. C. Baker, who had labored so long and so faithfully for us. Bro. C. P. Rowland was in our midst the past few weeks and held some splendid cottage meetings, which were much enjoyed by all. As an immediate result, one was reclaimed, and the members were all encouraged and built up. Bro. Rowland has always been untiring in his efforts to do us good, and the members at Chippewa Valley will always think kindly of him. We are glad for the association we have had with him these many years. —John Cripe, R. D. 5, Mondovi, Wis., March 1.

WISCONSIN
 [The Gospel Messenger, December 22, 1917]
Chippewa Valley church met in council Dec. 1, with our elder, Bro. G. L. Fruit, of Viola, Wis., presiding. Bro. C. L. Salsbury was chosen Sunday-school superintendent. Bro. Fruit came on Wednesday before Thanksgiving and was with us over Sunday. He gave us inspiring sermons each evening and also on Sunday morning. A Thanksgiving offering of $15 was taken for the benefit of the suffering Armenians and Belgians. —John Cripe, R. D. 5, Box 105, Mondovi, Wis.

WISCONSIN
 [The Gospel Messenger, September 28, 1918]
Chippewa Valley church met in council Sept. 7, with Eld. G. L. Fruit presiding. We decided to hold a love feast some time during the month of October. Bro. Fruit was chosen as our elder for another quarter. Since our last report, two have been received into the church by baptism, —one a young brother who has since been called to serve his country. —John Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., Sept. 11.

HOME AND FAMILY
Mrs. Henry C. Baker
[The Gospel Messenger, March 8, 1919]
Katie Baker, nee Diermyer, was born Feb. 2, 1853, in Bucyrus, Crawford County, Ohio. In 1862, she, with her parents and four children, younger than herself, moved to St. Joseph County, Ind., the journey being made overland with team and covered wagon.
June 23, 1872, she married Henry C. Baker.  To them were born five daughters and four sons, who survive. All were present at the funeral but one. Sister Baker also leaves twenty-three grandchildren, two brothers and one sister. Two sisters preceded her. She also leaves four nieces and one nephew. The latter lost his mother when but three years old. Sister Baker took the little boy into her home, caring for him and bestowing on him the wealth of a mother’s love, while also caring for her own family.
Bro. Baker and family moved from Indiana to Peru, Wis., in 1878, and in March, 1891, to their farm in Albany, where they have since resided.
The sudden death of her husband, Eld. H. C. Baker, which occurred over two years ago, was a great shock to her, and one from which she never recovered. Slowly she declined till Feb. 3, 1919, when, following an attack of heart failure, her spirit took its upward flight to be forever with her Lord. She was a charter member of the Albany church. She was a spiritual mother to all and always had their welfare at heart. Together with her husband, she labored faithfully for the good of the cause. The church will greatly miss an efficient worker and leader. The loss comes doubly hard, following so closely the death of her husband. The children have lost a kind and loving mother—one who was always thoughtful of them and did all in her power to promote their welfare. The loss of their father is still keenly felt, for his thoughts were always for those nearest and dearest to him. May their spirits continue to guide those who mourn! The good seed sown by them fell not on barren soil. Forty-four years ago she was baptized, and her faith in the Divine Father has never wavered but grown stronger and brighter as she neared life’s sunset.
The funeral was held on Monday in the Chippewa Valley church, where she had worshiped for the past twenty-five years. Services were conducted by Bro. J. M. Myers, of Stanley, assisted by Brethren Root and Salsbury.
Mrs. D. T. Cripe

EDITORIAL REVIEW
[The Brethren Evangelist, October 22, 1919]
Brother J. A. Baker calls attention to the fact that his address has been changed from 613 Churchill St., Eau Claire, Wisconsin, to Mondovi, Wisconsin, Route 5, Box 113. He makes a second appeal in behalf of an afflicted brother of his church, Brother A. E. Baker. Will not a number of churches and individuals heed this call?
Note: The Brethren Evangelist was associated with the Brethren Church, not the Church of the Brethren.

WISCONSIN
 [The Gospel Messenger, September 6, 1919]
Chippewa Valley. —August 15, Eld. S. C. Miller, of Elgin, Ill., met with the members in council. The following evening and on Sunday morning he gave us very inspiring sermons, which were much enjoyed by all. We were sorry that his stay at this place had to be so short. We decided to hold a series of meetings sometime this fall, to be followed by a love feast. The date has not yet been decided. John Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., August 22.

WISCONSIN
 [The Gospel Messenger, October 4, 1919]
Chippewa Valley. —Sept. 3 Bro. Clark C. Myers, of Waddams Grove, Ill., began a series of meetings, which lasted until Sept. 21. The interest and attendance were splendid, and we feel that the influence of these meetings will be far-reaching and productive of much good. Fourteen were received into the church by baptism, and one was reclaimed. Sept. 20 we held a love feast, with about sixty-five members present. Bro. Myers officiated, assisted by the home ministers. This was followed by an all-day meeting on Sunday, with a large attendance. We were all glad for the meetings, and the earnest efforts that were put forth by Bro. Myers will be long remembered. —John Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., Sept. 24.

WISCONSIN
[The Gospel Messenger, November 15, 1919]
Chippewa Valley. —We held an all-day Harvest Meeting Oct. 11, which was well attended and very much enjoyed by all. Bro. C. C. Myers, of Waddams Grove, Ill., preached some fine sermons and remained over Sunday. We took an offering of $823.60, to be used for building sheds and repairing the church house. Oct. 14 Bro. Roger D. Winger, of Chicago, came to this place in the interest of the “Forward Movement” and delivered four very fine lectures, which were an inspiration for greater service. An offering of $34.79 was taken for World-wide Missions. These meetings were very well attended and much appreciated by all. —John Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., Nov. 3.

CORRESPONDENCE
[The Gospel Messenger, February 28, 1920]
DEATH OF BRO. COLLIN P. ROWLAND
Bro. Collin P. Rowland was born in Cherry Grove Township Oct. 18, 1849. He was the son of John and Susan Rowland, and brother of George H. and John E. Rowland, and of Sister Mary McCune, who passed away in 1906.

He was united in marriage to Sarah A. Boyd Feb. 6, 1873, by Eld. Henry Martin. Feb. 20, 1874, they united with the church of the Brethren. Later, he was elected to the office of deacon, which position he held until he was elected to the ministry, in March, 1890, and ordained to the eldership in May, 1898.

Bro. Rowland was appointed to the office of Secretary-Treasurer of the district Mission Board of Northern Illinois and Wisconsin May 9, 1882, and was active in that capacity for a long period of years.

Their children are Harry M. Rowland, of Lanark, and Clinton C. Rowland, of Cherry Grove. The grandchildren are John Loren Rowland and Erma Marguerite Rowland.

In the fall of 1887, the writer was in the home of Brother and Sister Rowland for some time, and has been intimately acquainted with the family ever since. He noted then, and since, that Brother Rowland was ambitious and very zealous for the cause of the Master, and that he was always present in the house of God when health would permit.

His zeal led him out into the work of the church where his efforts were much appreciated. For the past twenty-five years, much of the preaching and church work done by Bro. Rowland has been done in out-of-the-way places, in needy and neglected fields, where there was little hope of remuneration.

Feb. 27, 1919, he left his home for this kind of work, and while purchasing a ticket at Madison, Wis., was suddenly overcome, as a result of a blood-clot on the brain, and has been in failing health ever since.

Jan. 29, 1920, he suffered a severe stroke, from which he never regained consciousness, and passed away at his home on North Broad Street, Lanark, Ill., where they have lived since April 10, 1906. At the time of his death he had reached the age of seventy years, three months and seventeen days. Services from the Church of the Brethren Feb. 6, by Eld. P. F. Eckerle, assisted by Elders I. R. Young, Charles E. Delp and S. I. Newcomer. Text, Luke 12:23.
P. F. Eckerle.
Lanark, Ill.

MISCELLANEOUS MENTION
[The Gospel Messenger, May 1, 1920]
The Chippewa Valley church, Wis., is in need of pastoral help. Any minister who may contemplate a change of location will please address John Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., for further particulars.

WISCONSIN
 [The Gospel Messenger, May 1, 1920]
Chippewa Valley church met in council April 3, with Bro. C. C. Myers in charge. As this church is left without a minister, we are trying to make arrangements to have Bro. Myers with us at least once a month. We need ministerial help and would gladly welcome anyone contemplating a change of location. —John Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., April 16.

THE WISCONSIN FIELD
[The Gospel Messenger, August 14, 1920]
The death of Eld. H. C. Baker, who for years labored faithfully for the Chippewa Valley church, has had its effect on the work here. We found, however, a very interesting and zealous band of ninety members, mostly young people. While they have no resident elder, they have two ministers, Lewis Salsbury and Lester Root, who very nicely, along with their farm work, will care for the work here until we can get someone to give this field his entire time. We have reason to be encouraged with the work here, which is one of the oldest of our churches in the state. With such a large number of young people, the outlook is certainly hopeful. We are encouraged to work harder than ever to carry forward our work in Wisconsin.
C. C. Price.
Polo, Ill.

DRAMMEN
(Correspondence)
[The Eau Claire Leader, January 11, 1921]
Lester Root was home from the Bethany School, Chicago, over the holidays.

DRAMMEN
(Correspondence)
[The Eau Claire Leader, January 26, 1921]
A revival meeting is going on at the Church of the Brethren House conducted by Rev. C. C. Myers of Chicago.

DRAMMEN
(Correspondence)
[The Eau Claire Leader, Friday, February 4, 1921]
The Ladies’ Aid of the Church of [the] Brethren will meet Wednesday at 2 p. m. at the home of Mrs. David Cripe.

SISTERS’ AID SOCIETIES
[The Gospel Messenger, March 5, 1921]
Chippewa Valley, Wis.—Report of Sisters’ Aid Society: We held 11 meetings; average attendance, 26. Our work consisted mostly of making quilts and prayer coverings. We received during the year for lunches and prayer coverings, $38.46; for interest on deposit certificates, $4.80; total, $43.26; we spent $8.77, $5 of which was for Forward Movement; carried over from last year, $98.16; cash on hand, $14.42. We expect to refinish the interior of our church with our funds this spring. Officers: Sister Estella Peden, President; Sister Hulda Davis, Vice-President; Sister Iness Cripe, Secretary-Treasurer. —Mrs. Mae Cripe, Mondovi, Wis., Feb. 12.

DRAMMEN
(Correspondence)
[The Eau Claire Leader, March 30, 1921]
The Church of the Brethren had an Easter program Sunday evening.
__________
Lester Root who is attending the Bible Institute at Chicago is here for a few days.
__________
The Church of the Brethren Ladies’ Aid met with Mrs. John Mikesell Wednesday afternoon.

In The Shadow
[The Brethren Evangelist, April 27, 1921]
Baker—Lafayette M. Baker was born near Columbia City, Indiana, April 18, 1853. His death occurred at Cornell, Wisconsin, April 10, 1921, aged 67 years, 11 months, and 10 days. Cause of death was cancer of the stomach. He was a brother to J. A. Baker, pastor of the Brethren church at Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and was baptized at the same time. He had another brother, J. D. Baker of Benton Harbor, Michigan. He was united in marriage to Mary L. Crist of Menomonie, in the year 1878, to which union 6 children were born, one dying in infancy. He leaves 5 children and 19 grandchildren to mourn his departure. The funeral was held at Cornell, Wisconsin, Wednesday, April 13, at the M. E. church, the pastor, Rev. A. H. Lambright, officiating. The large concourse of friends and neighbors in attendance at the funeral showed the high esteem in which he was held.

J. H. BAKER